Confirmed cases in Kansas
(as of April 6)
846
Confirmed cases in Harvey County
(as of April 6)
4
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The Harvey County Health Department announced its first presumptive-positive case of novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, in Harvey County on March 26.

The case was identified through testing at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Kansas Health and Environmental Laboratories. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will verify results, but the case is treated as confirmed unless determined otherwise.

The confirmed case is a Harvey County man in his 20s. The individual is in home isolation. He had been in contact with an individual from another county that was found to have COVID-19. The Health Department and KDHE will regularly monitor the individual. Those who he has been in contact with have been notified, and they will self-monitor for 14 days. 

"Our local health partners have prepared for a confirmed case as a 'when,' not an 'if.' We have been practicing and reviewing our COVID-19 preparedness steps for several weeks," said Harvey County Health Department Director Lynnette Redington. "All of our organizations were able to follow through with correct procedures to ensure the safety of the individual and local staff."

Redington encouraged county residents to continue to practice good hygiene techniques, such as hand washing, coughing or sneezing into your elbow or a tissue and reducing physical interactions. Those that feel ill should stay home and contact their medical provider to discuss symptoms.

As of the morning of March 26, the KDHE had confirmed 168 cases of COVID-19 in Kansas, not including the case in Harvey County. The first confirmed case in the state was identified in Johnson County on March 7.

The KDHE has a phone hotline available to answer questions or concerns regarding COVID-19 at 1-866-534-3463. Resources are also available on the KDHE website

Novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, has required an unprecedented response at the state, national and global levels as populations work to reduce its potential spread.

Those actions have changed our everyday lives. Additional measures are being taken and enhanced in efforts to mitigate the impacts. Here are some of the resources and changes made.

Businesses

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering disaster assistance loans for businesses impacted by the coronavirus response. The Economic Injury Disaster Loans offer up to $2 million in assistance.

Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly has established the Hospitality Industry Relief Emergency (HIRE) Fund to aid the hospitality sector. The order allocates $5 million in short-term, zero-interest loans to hospitality businesses. The HIRE Fund offers up to $20,000 in loans for a three-year term to businesses with less than 100 employees.

Charitable Organizations

Several groups and organizations throughout Harvey County have taken the initiative to help those in need. Harvey County directed financial contributions to two local organizations to help them direct and fulfill their efforts.

The Harvey County Commission committed $25,000 to the Newton Ministerial Alliance, which oversees the Harvest of Love food pantry. This funding will go toward acquiring food, baby care products and other sustenance products to distribute to those in need throughout the county.

The Commission also directed $50,000 to the Central Kansas Community Foundation for a community relief fund. The CKCF will allocate funding to charitable organizations in Harvey County that are anticipated to see an increase in demand for services.

Driver's License and Vehicle Registration

Driver's license renewals and vehicle registrations can be completed within 60 days of their expiration, in accordance with an executive order from Gov. Kelly. The Department of Homeland Security announced it will extend the Real ID deadline to Oct. 1, 2021.

Evictions and Foreclosures

Gov. Kelly revised an executive order March 23 that prohibits financial institutions from initiating mortgage foreclosures and commercial or residential eviction efforts until May 1 if the financial hardship is directly or indirectly caused by COVID-19.

Grocery Stores

Several grocery stores have dedicated specific hours to provide time for seniors to shop while reducing potential exposure.

Dillons: Stores are open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Dillons will open to seniors 60 and over and other higher-risk customers from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. Monday through Thursday.

Dollar General: Dollar General is encouraging the first hour stores are open be used for seniors.

Walgreens: Walgreens will open to seniors 55 and over from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. on Tuesdays. Walgreens is also offering free shipping and drive-thru services for seniors. 

Walmart: Stores are open 7 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Walmart will open to seniors 60 and over for one hour prior to the store opening on Tuesdays through April 28.

Health Care

Gov. Kelly announced expanded health care options to help reduce in-person patients as medical professionals focus on COVID-19. The measures include allowing doctors to prescribe medication after a telemedicine consultation and authorizing licensed out-of-state doctors to provide telemedicine services to Kansas.

Internal Revenue Service

The IRS has extended the federal income tax filing due date from April 15 to July 15. Income tax payments due on April 15 can also be deferred until July 15 without penalty or interest.

Mental Health

The challenges of COVID-19 may cause increased stress or anxiety for you or a loved one. Additionally, the directive of social distancing may make you feel separated. Consider calling or sending a note to a friend or loved one to ask how they are doing. Try to maintain your normal routines, such as working out, spending time outdoors and sleeping right.

Prairie View has a mental health crisis hotline available at all times. It can be reached at 1-800-362-0180.

Schools

Gov. Kelly announced March 17 that K-12 school buildings would be closed for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. A Continuous Learning Task Force has outlined guidance to continue to provide educational opportunities, as well as meal access. For more on local school districts' efforts, click on the applicable district below:

Utilities

The Kansas Corporation Commission used emergency powers to stop utility disconnects due to nonpayment through April 15. This includes electric, natural gas, water and telecommunications under its jurisdiction.

WIC Program

Benefits will continue and new applicants can still apply for benefits. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has waived the requirement that participants and applicants be physically present to receive services through May 31.

Harvey County has implemented several operational changes in its organization in its effort to reduce the potential spread of novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, in Harvey County.

Beginning March 25, county facilities are closed to the public until further notice. Essential functions remain available by phone, email and online. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Harvey County was announced March 26.


Operations

Commission

Due to Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly's executive order to limit gatherings to 10 people, the public temporarily can't attend meetings in person. However, the public can and is encouraged to still participate. Meetings will be held over Zoom, where users will be able to call in or view the meeting. The meeting ID is 408 180 699. The phone number is +1 301 715 8592. The meeting can be joined online at https://zoom.us/j/408180699. Commission meetings are held Tuesdays at 9 a.m.  

Communications

Dispatchers are asking additional precautionary questions for callers that report symptoms related to COVID-19, including cough, shortness of breath and a fever of 100.4 F or higher.

Court Services

Harvey and McPherson counties are closed except for emergency operations, in accordance with Kansas Supreme Court Administrative Order 2020-PR-016. Court services officers will limit face-to-face contact with probation and bond offenders.

Department on Aging

Interurban transportation recreational and airport trips have been suspended. Interurban will be available for transportation to medical, work and grocery store visits.

District Court

Harvey and McPherson counties are closed except for emergency operations, in accordance with Kansas Supreme Court Administrative Order 2020-PR-016.

Health

Appointment only. Offices are closed daily from noon to 1 p.m.

Kansas State Research and Extension - Harvey County

In-person meetings, events and sponsored programs through May 16 have been canceled or postponed. Staff are following work-from-home guidance, with limited staffing available by phone in the office. The office is closed daily from noon to 1 p.m.

Parks

Parks are open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Camping is not available. Playgrounds and restrooms are closed. Visitors must practice social distancing. All scheduled events in Harvey County Camp Hawk, East Park and West Park have been canceled through April. Enclosed shelter reservations have also been canceled through April - those that have previously booked an event have been contacted and arrangements made to fully refund their deposits. Open shelter reservations will be honored with the adherence to the requirement of gatherings of less than 10 people. Additionally, while future shelter reservations will be accepted, they are done with the acknowledgement that mass gathering guidance may alter availability.

Register of Deeds

Researchers will be allowed by appointment only.

Sheriff's Office

In-person visitation and support services at the Harvey County Detention Center have been suspended. Inmates still have access to phone calls. Video conferencing is also available through Securus Technologies.

Fingerprinting services for the public have been suspended.



Services Available Online

Additionally, Harvey County has several services that can be conducted online.

Clerk's Office
Candidate Filing (deadline June 1 at noon): Forms can be found online:  https://www.hvcoksvote.com/candidate-information

Hunting and Fishing Licenses: Forms can be found online:  https://ksoutdoors.com/

Boat Licenses: Forms can be found online:  https://ksoutdoors.com/Boating/Registering-Your-Boat

Homestead Act Tax Claims: Forms can be found online: https://www.kansas.gov/ssrv-homestead/welcome.html

Voter Registration: New registration and checking existing registration can be done online: https://www.ksvotes.org/

District Court
Electronic filings can still be made through the E-FLEX system. Fax filings are also encouraged.

Kansas State Research and Extension - Harvey County
Although extension agents will have limited scheduled availability in the office, all are still available through various communication tools. Contact information for extension agents can be found here: https://www.harvey.k-state.edu/about/staff/

Planning, Zoning and Environmental
Permits: Fees can be paid over-the-phone or by check. Applications can be found online: https://www.harveycounty.com/departments/planning-a-zoning/permit-fees-and-applications.html

Register of Deeds
Deed or Ownership of Residence: Information can be found online:  https://www.harveycounty.com/departments/appraiser.html 

Treasurer's Office
Driver's License Renewals: Qualifying renewals can be done here:  https://ikan.ks.gov/

Tag Renewals: Payments can be done by mail with copies of insurance cards included. Payments can also be left in the drop box on the south side of the Harvey County Courthouse. Qualifying renewals can be done here: https://ikan.ks.gov/

Real Estate Taxes: Payments can be done by mail. Payments can also be left in the drop box on the south side of the Harvey County Courthouse. Payments can also be made by phone. Additionally, payments can be done online: https://www.kansas.gov/propertytax/.

Novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a new virus that causes respiratory illness in people. It was first identified in an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China toward the end of 2019. The first United States case was announced Jan. 21, 2020. The first case in Kansas was identified in Johnson County on March 7. Harvey County confirmed its first COVID-19 case on March 26.

What makes COVID-19 different than other respiratory illnesses like the flu?

The challenge of COVID-19 is there is no verified treatment or vaccine at this time. Researchers across the world continue to strive to learn more about COVID-19. There are many types of human coronaviruses, but COVID-19 is novel because it had not previously been seen in humans. The name COVID-19 is an abbreviation of (co)rona(vi)rus (d)isease 20(19).

How does COVID-19 spread?

Health experts are still identifying details about COVID-19. Other coronaviruses spread from an infected person after they begin to show symptoms. Coronaviruses can spread through the air by coughing and sneezing, close contact such as touching or shaking hands, and touching an object or surface with the virus on it and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes. There is no current evidence that COVID-19 transmission is associated with food or drinking water.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Patients have reported mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath. Symptoms typically appear 2-14 days after exposure. In severe cases, infection can cause bronchitis, pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death. The illness seems to be more severe in older individuals and people with underlying health conditions. If you feel ill with COVID-19 symptoms, call your medical provider to discuss symptoms.

How can I help protect myself and my family?

Everyday preventative steps can help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.
  • Cough or sneeze into your elbow or a tissue.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home if you are sick.

Should I wear a face cover? 

The CDC announced April 3 that it has begun recommending wearing cloth face coverings in public settings when it is difficult to maintain social distancing and in areas of significant community-based transmission. The CDC urges not to use surgical masks or N95 respirators, as those are critical supplies needed for medical professionals and first responders.

Can I help provide supplies to medical professionals and first responders?

Additional resources are in need across the United States. While Harvey County organizations have the needed materials in stock now, there may be a future shortage as the availability of supply chains tighten due to global demand. Harvey County Emergency Management handles resource coordination, and would gladly accept additional supplies from the public. Some of the most desired items include:

  • N95 respirators
  • Surgical masks
  • Face shields
  • Disposable gowns
  • Coveralls
  • Latex and nitrile exam gloves

If you have supplies you would like to provide, please contact Emergency Management at 316-284-6910 or the Harvey County Courthouse at 316-284-6800. Supplies can also be taken to The Salvation Army in Newton, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

What is the limit on gathering size?

On March 23, Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly announced an executive order to limit gatherings to 10 people until further guidance is provided. The Harvey County Health Department has also recommended all non-essential events be canceled or postponed. Limiting contacts through social distancing helps reduce potential exposure to COVID-19.

Is Kansas under a Stay Home order?

Gov. Kelly announced a Stay Home executive order for Kansas in effect from March 30 to April 19. It requires Kansans to stay home except to go to work to perform an essential function; obtain food, medicine or household necessities; medical care; caring for children, family members or pets; or exercise while abiding by social distancing and gathering guidelines.

What is considered an essential business?

Essential business functions are outlined in the Kansas Essential Functions Framework. There is no prior approval needed to be deemed an essential business. Organizations that are unsure if their business meets essential criteria can visit the KEFF website or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

What is social distancing?

Social distancing means purposely maintaining more physical space between yourself and another person. Social distancing recommendations are to be at least 6 feet away from another person, and no more than 10 minutes within 6 feet of someone if necessary. This helps reduce potential exposure to COVID-19.

What does 'flattening the curve' mean?

Flattening the curve is an important principle because it helps lessen the strain on the medical community. If COVID-19 cases increase at a rapid rate, it also increases the workload of medical professionals and can quickly deplete available resources. To subdue that, measures like limiting mass gatherings and social distancing are put in place. This 'flattens the curve,' meaning the number of new cases would come in more slowly, allowing medical professionals more time in the treatment process.

Why would someone need to quarantine or isolate?

Isolation separates people with a contagious disease from the well population. A quarantine separates and restricts the movement of someone who was exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick. Both directives are meant to reduce the potential spread of COVID-19. Those in home quarantine should not attend school, work or any other setting where they cannot maintain a 6-foot distance from other people.

Are we allowed to travel outside the United States?

As of March 19, the U.S. Department of State advised U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel.

Who should quarantine?

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment mandates a 14-day quarantine for Kansans who have:

  • Traveled to California, Florida, New York and Washington state on or after March 15.
  • Traveled to Illinois or New Jersey on or after March 23.
  • Traveled to Louisiana or Colorado on or after March 27.
  • Visited Eagle, Summit, Pitkin and Gunnison counties in Colorado in the week prior to March 15 or after.
  • Traveled on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15. Those previously told by public health to quarantine because of cruise ship travel should finish out their quarantine.
  • Traveled internationally on or after March 15. Those previously told by public health to quarantine because of their international travel to China, South Korea, Japan, Italy and Iran should finish out their quarantine.

What is a confirmed case?

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment and some private laboratories provide COVID-19 testing. The KDHE will announce if it confirms the individual is presumptive positive. The test is presumptive because a second test will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to verify the result.

For answers to more common questions, visit the CDC and the KDHE websites.  

Novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a respiratory disease. COVID-19 was first identified in an outbreak in Wuhan, China, but has spread to dozens of countries, including the United States.

The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Kansas was announced March 7 in a Johnson County resident. On March 12, Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly announced the first coronavirus-related death in Kansas, a Wyandotte County resident. She also made an emergency declaration, which aids the state in coordinating resources.

As of April 6, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment has confirmed 846 COVID-19 cases, including 25 deaths. The first case in Harvey County was announced March 26. Harvey County has had four confirmed cases, with two of those individuals recovered.

On March 28, Gov. Kelly announced a Stay Home executive order for Kansas. The order is in effect from March 30 to April 19. It requires Kansans to stay home except to go to work to perform an essential function; obtain food, medicine or household necessities; medical care; caring for children, family members or pets; or exercise while abiding by social distancing and gathering guidelines.

COVID-19 spreads person-to-person, likely from people in close contact to one another through an infected person's coughs or sneezes, according to the CDC. The CDC reports the virus may also spread by a person touching a surface that has the virus on it, and then touching their own nose, mouth or possibly their eyes. Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough and shortness of breath.

There are several ways to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including COVID-19. Wash your hands, clean surfaces, cough or sneeze into your sleeve or a tissue, avoid close contact with people who are sick and stay home when you are sick. If you feel ill with COVID-19 symptoms, call your medical provider to discuss symptoms.


Harvey County Commission Chair Randy Hague signed a local emergency declaration March 13. An emergency declaration helps the County with resource coordination. The Commission later extended that declaration March 31 for an additional 60 days.

Beginning March 25, Harvey County facilities are closed to the public by order of the Commission. County staff will continue to report to their job sites, and will be available to help residents with requests by phone, email or online. 

Gov. Kelly announced March 23 that gatherings in Kansas be limited to 10 people.

It is important to be informed of COVID-19's potential continued spread locally, nationally and globally, as well as to take preparedness steps for yourself. 
There are several resources available to you to learn more about coronavirus:


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