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Here's an inside peak at the awesome collaboration we were a part of yesterday to help pack up boxes of food for the First Responders Holiday Helpers event. It's a well-oiled machine (and we sped the video up to make it look like we're super fast). There were first responders there from Harvey County, City of Newton, Sedgwick County and more. It's an amazing feeling to know the effort is going toward something great right here in our communities. Thanks again to everyone that helped make this possible for us. ... See moreSee less

First Responders Holiday Helpers packing

 

Comment on Facebook

nice work

Great job well done and God bless all of you guys

That is awesome!!!

You all rock

Thank you for again helping our community❤️

Great job!

+ View previous comments

21 hours ago

Harvey County Parks

This weeks critter is the:
Carolina Wren
Scientific name: Thryothorus ludovicianus
Length: 4.7 – 5.5 in. (12 – 14 cm.)
Weight: 0.6 – 0.8 oz. (18-22g)
Wingspan: 11.4 in. (29 cm.)

The Carolina wren is a small, chunky and round – shaped bird. The species is smaller than a sparrow and larger than a house wren. Both male and female adults are Reddish – brown or chestnut colored on the topside of their body with light cinnamon colored underparts. This bird has a bold white stripe above its eye, extending to the base of its head. The bill is long, thin and slightly down curved. The chin and throat of the bird is white. The tail of this bird is about the size of its body, and is often times cocked up. The wings and tail have bold dark barring. Individuals will perch bent over, holding their tails up which emphasizes the black barring. These birds are usually found in dense woodland and shrubby habitats. Individuals visit neighborhood areas and will visit feeders, especially during colder months. The Carolina wren is the state bird of South Carolina, and individuals have been known to live up to ten years.
Look and listen for Carolina wrens singing and calling in wooded areas. They like to creep around vegetation, looking for insects and fruit. It is considered to be a weak flyer, and tends to make brief, quick aerial forays over short distances. They like to move low through a tangled understory of vines and bushes. These birds are rarely stationary and avoid being out in the open for extended periods of time. In neighborhoods, this bird explores yard and wood, sometimes nesting there. This wren usually forages with its tail up. While singing, the tail is down. These birds defend their territories with constant singing and calling. They may use loud calls to defend against predators and intruders.
The Carolina wren is a common species of wren that lives in the eastern half of the United States, the southern part of Ontario, Canada and the extreme northeastern part of Mexico. They do not migrate and are somewhat limited by winter conditions. Severe winters restrict the northern limit of their range, while a mild winter will lead to northward extension of their breeding range. There are seven recognized subspecies of Carolina wren, each having a slightly different song and appearance. Individuals from southern Texas and northeastern Mexico are more boldly barred on the wings and tail and also are barred faintly on the flanks and back. Individuals from southern Mexico and central America are dingy white below with brown upper-parts. The Florida population has individuals that are larger and darker in color.
The loud and cheerful song is often times heard before the bird is seen. Both sexes use alarm calls, but only the males sing to advertise territory. Males sing a series of quick whistled notes. These are usually repeated in three parts, “tea – kettle – tea – kettle,” or “Germany – Germany.”
The Carolina wren’s diet mostly consists of insects and spiders. They climb and hop up branches, foraging for insects. They use their curved bills to turn over decaying vegetation and hammer larger bugs. Other food items for this bird include: caterpillars, moths, stick bugs, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets and cockroaches. On occasion, these wrens will eat lizards, frogs, or snakes. They also eat a small amount of plant matter, such as fruit pulp and seeds from bayberry, sweetgum or poison ivy.
Female Caroling wrens can begin laying eggs as early as March in southern populations and as early as April in northern populations. A pair may bond at any time of the year and will remain together for life. Individuals nesting in the northern part of the range usually raise two broods per year, while pairs in the southern region can raise up to three per year. Pairs stay bonded year- round and do not take a break from defending their territory. Carolina wrens nest in open cavities 3-6 feet off the ground, in trees or other more versatile areas. They may make use of flower pots and mailboxes. Carolina wrens nests have even been found in coat pockets and boots. Both males and females build their nests together. One may stay at the nest site while the other gathers materials. The nest is loosely constructed with a wide variety of materials being used (bark, dried grass, dead leaves, pine needles, hair, paper, string, shed snake skin, plastic). The first nest may take a week or longer to build, while later nests may take only 4 days. Multiple nests may be built before one is selected. The nest is cup-shaped and usually domed having a side entrance. Many times the nest has a woven extension similar to an entry-way or porch. Nests may vary in size, ranging from 3-9 inches long and 3-6 inches wide.
The clutch size of the Carolina wren is between 3 and 7 eggs. Egg length is about 0.7 inches long and 0.6 inches wide, and are white/cream or pinkish white with fine rusty-brown spots. Chicks emerge after a 10-16 day incubation period and are covered in pale grayish down. After fledging the nest, family groups will search for food together.
Carolina wrens will visit suet-filled feeders and in cold northern winters they will take shelter in nest boxes containing dried grasses. They particularly like boxes with slots rather than holes. During breeding season these wrens may nest in boxes, but are just as likely to choose a hanging plant or brush pile for a nesting site. Consider putting up a nest box to attract a breeding p air. Put the box up well before breeding season and attach a guard to keep out predators. Learn about offering shelter to backyard birds at www.allaboutbirds.org/how-to-provide-seeds-and-shelter-for-backyard-birds/. Keeping a brush pile in your yard is a great way to encourage wrens to take up residence there.

Sources
Dunne, P. (2006). Pete Dunne’s essential field guide companion. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, New York, USA.
... See moreSee less

This weeks critter is the:
Carolina Wren
Scientific name: Thryothorus ludovicianus
Length: 4.7 – 5.5 in. (12 – 14 cm.)
Weight: 0.6 – 0.8 oz. (18-22g) 
Wingspan: 11.4 in. (29 cm.) 

 The Carolina wren is a small, chunky and round – shaped bird. The species is smaller than a sparrow and larger than a house wren.  Both male and female adults are Reddish – brown or chestnut colored on the topside of their body with light cinnamon colored underparts. This bird has a bold white stripe above its eye, extending to the base of its head. The bill is long, thin and slightly down curved. The chin and throat of the bird is white. The tail of this bird is about the size of its body, and is often times cocked up. The wings and tail have bold dark barring. Individuals will perch bent over, holding their tails up which emphasizes the black barring. These birds are usually found in dense woodland and shrubby habitats. Individuals visit neighborhood areas and will visit feeders, especially during colder months. The Carolina wren is the state bird of South Carolina, and individuals have been known to live up to ten years.
 Look and listen for Carolina wrens singing and calling in wooded areas. They like to creep around vegetation, looking for insects and fruit. It is considered to be a weak flyer, and tends to make brief, quick aerial forays over short distances. They like to move low through a tangled understory of vines and bushes. These birds are rarely stationary and avoid being out in the open for extended periods of time. In neighborhoods, this bird explores yard and wood, sometimes nesting there. This wren usually forages with its tail up. While singing, the tail is down. These birds defend their territories with constant singing and calling. They may use loud calls to defend against predators and intruders. 
 The Carolina wren is a common species of wren that lives in the eastern half of the United States, the southern part of Ontario, Canada and the extreme northeastern part of Mexico. They do not migrate and are somewhat limited by winter conditions. Severe winters restrict the northern limit of their range, while a mild winter will lead to northward extension of their breeding range. There are seven recognized subspecies of Carolina wren, each having a slightly different song and appearance. Individuals from southern Texas and northeastern Mexico are more boldly barred on the wings and tail and also are barred faintly on the flanks and back. Individuals from southern Mexico and central America are dingy white below with brown upper-parts. The Florida population has individuals that are larger and darker in color. 
 The loud and cheerful song is often times heard before the bird is seen. Both sexes use alarm calls, but only the males sing to advertise territory. Males sing a series of quick whistled notes. These are usually repeated in three parts, “tea – kettle – tea – kettle,” or “Germany – Germany.” 
 The Carolina wren’s diet mostly consists of insects and spiders. They climb and hop up branches, foraging for insects. They use their curved bills to turn over decaying vegetation and hammer larger bugs. Other food items for this bird include: caterpillars, moths, stick bugs, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets and cockroaches. On occasion, these wrens will eat lizards, frogs, or snakes. They also eat a small amount of plant matter, such as fruit pulp and seeds from bayberry, sweetgum or poison ivy. 
 Female Caroling wrens can begin laying eggs as early as March in southern populations and as early as April in northern populations. A pair may bond at any time of the year and will remain together for life. Individuals nesting in the northern part of the range usually raise two broods per year, while pairs in the southern region can raise up to three per year. Pairs stay bonded year- round and do not take a break from defending their territory. Carolina wrens nest in open cavities 3-6 feet off the ground, in trees or other more versatile areas. They may make use of flower pots and mailboxes. Carolina wrens nests have even been found in coat pockets and boots. Both males and females build their nests together. One may stay at the nest site while the other gathers materials. The nest is loosely constructed with a wide variety of materials being used (bark, dried grass, dead leaves, pine needles, hair, paper, string, shed snake skin, plastic). The first nest may take a week or longer to build, while later nests may take only 4 days. Multiple nests may be built before one is selected. The nest is cup-shaped and usually domed having a side entrance. Many times the nest has a woven extension similar to an entry-way or porch. Nests may vary in size, ranging from 3-9 inches long and 3-6 inches wide. 
 The clutch size of the Carolina wren is between 3 and 7 eggs. Egg length is about 0.7 inches long and 0.6 inches wide, and are white/cream or pinkish white with fine rusty-brown spots. Chicks emerge after a 10-16 day incubation period and are covered in pale grayish down. After fledging the nest, family groups will search for food together. 
 Carolina wrens will visit suet-filled feeders and in cold northern winters they will take shelter in nest boxes containing dried grasses. They particularly like boxes with slots rather than holes. During breeding season these wrens may nest in boxes, but are just as likely to choose a hanging plant or brush pile for a nesting site. Consider putting up a nest box to attract a breeding p air. Put the box up well before breeding season and attach a guard to keep out predators. Learn about offering shelter to backyard birds at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/how-to-provide-seeds-and-shelter-for-backyard-birds/. Keeping a brush pile in your yard is a great way to encourage wrens to take up residence there. 

Sources
Dunne, P. (2006). Pete Dunne’s essential field guide companion. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, New York, USA.Image attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

I love seeing these posts!

2 days ago

Harvey County

Squad goals! 😁 Great work! 💪🥫📦Our Emergency Response Team deployed for an important mission today - boxing up food for the First Responders Holiday Helpers program. Our crew is prettttty easy to spot in these pics.

With the help of Newton KS Police Department and Newton Fire/EMS, we stacked up 16 pallets for Harvey County. That's more than 500 boxes!

There are so many people to thank for making this happen, but most of all, it starts with our communities. The money we helped raise was put toward these boxes of food, and in turn they will be delivered locally to those in need. We are also so, so thankful that Dillons partners with us to do this. They share their staff, supplies and warehouse space for the day to make this possible. It's a great initiative, and we love being a part of it.
... See moreSee less

Squad goals! 😁 Great work! 💪🥫📦

2 days ago

Harvey County Sheriff's Office

Our Emergency Response Team deployed for an important mission today - boxing up food for the First Responders Holiday Helpers program. Our crew is prettttty easy to spot in these pics.

With the help of Newton KS Police Department and Newton Fire/EMS, we stacked up 16 pallets for Harvey County. That's more than 500 boxes!

There are so many people to thank for making this happen, but most of all, it starts with our communities. The money we helped raise was put toward these boxes of food, and in turn they will be delivered locally to those in need. We are also so, so thankful that Dillons partners with us to do this. They share their staff, supplies and warehouse space for the day to make this possible. It's a great initiative, and we love being a part of it.
... See moreSee less

 

Comment on Facebook

Awesomeness! Kindness, caring, compassion and selflessness leave everlasting gratitude. Thank you for being people with hearts full of genuine love for your community 💙

A community helping thier people ❤️

Thanks guys!! Your kindness makes me happy!!

That is AWESOME!!! Thank you for serving beyond your daily service and God Bless! Be Safe!!!

Thank you so much for doing this.

Great work!

💖💖Thank all of you for doing this 🤗🤗

👏❤️ PTL!!!

+ View previous comments

3 days ago

Harvey County Emergency Management

October 2018 flooding in Harvey County. ... See moreSee less

October 2018 flooding in Harvey County.

3 days ago

Harvey County Emergency Management

Harvey County Emergency Management logo ... See moreSee less

Harvey County Emergency Management logo

3 days ago

Harvey County

Yesssss can't wait!!! 👏 👏 🐟 🎣

Harvey County Parks
Today the Harvey County Parks Department crew braved the frozen water and cold temperatures to install this beautiful new fishing dock at Camp Hawk!
... See moreSee less

Harvey County Parks

Today the Harvey County Parks Department crew braved the frozen water and cold temperatures to install this beautiful new fishing dock at Camp Hawk! ... See moreSee less

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Comment on Facebook

Hooray!

Very nice err guys

👏

Many more water hookups for this coming season please

I know I'll be there this summer

Yay!!!!

Thank you. Will drive out to see.

+ View previous comments

3 days ago

Harvey County Health Department

Good read and resource in the county!Aaron Swank - Nutrition & Family Fiance Agent - sat with the staff at Conrade Insurance Group, Inc. here in Newton, Ks to discuss #SelfCare and #HealthyEating. This group over their lunch hour about the important role self-care plays in physical and psychological health. Self-care and well-being are two of Aaron's greatest passions.

"I use the analogy of the flight attendant speech: 'If/when your oxygen mask deploys and you are seated next to someone who needs assistance, whose mask goes on first? Yours or the person's next to you?'"

"The answer is yours. If your oxygen levels get too low, how can you possibly help the other person if you're passed out? The same is true for finding healthy, reliable means of coping with stress and valuing your health. We cannot positively contribute to the health of our loved ones, our neighbors, or our communities if we aren't positively contributing to our own."

"Many people believe that self-care is selfish. There is a difference between being selfish and being self-aware. One is self-serving. The other is about taking control of our #Health and placing value in not only our emotional and physical #WellBeing, but our lives as a whole so that we may continue the great work we do every single day. That is to serve and #MakeADifference in the lives of others. Self-care takes a lot of work. You are absolutely worth the effort. To better serve and love others, we must first learn to serve and love ourselves, unequivocally and unconditionally. #OnlyLoveCanSaveTheWorld"

If you are interested in hearing more about self-care, contact Aaron at the K-State Research & Extension Harvey County office at (316)284-6930.
... See moreSee less

Good read and resource in the county!

Today at the Harvey County Commission meeting, Courtney was presented with a stork pin. This recognizes the exemplary job he did in following EMD protocols and helping Jeff Toews of rural Whitewater deliver his granddaughter on the early morning of November 8. Great job Courtney!!! ... See moreSee less

Today at the Harvey County Commission meeting, Courtney was presented with a stork pin. This recognizes the exemplary job he did in following EMD protocols and helping Jeff Toews  of rural Whitewater deliver his granddaughter on the early morning of November 8. Great job Courtney!!!

 

Comment on Facebook

Good job Courtney

Way to do what your trained to do. Here is a cookie🍘

Way to go!

Job well done, congratulations!

So awesome!

A bit out of focus

+ View previous comments

 

Comment on Facebook

Thanks to the special lady that took my call in October and all who responded after the semi accident on 35 by NMC...so grateful for your patient and calm voice after what could have been a deadly accident...thankful to God for the safety in this situation and to you for your help in getting emergency personnel out so quickly...thank you...

Thank you for all you do for the citizens of Harvey County!

7 days ago

Harvey County

An opportunity coming up next week for employers and job seekers.Harvey County Multi Employer Job Fair | Wednesday December 12, 2018 ... See moreSee less

An opportunity coming up next week for employers and job seekers.

 

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Bradley Vincent Haynes

Need to catch up a bit on personnel changes around here...Sarah was hired in July to replace Darren. She comes to us with 13 years experience in Hays and has been quite the addition to our team! Caitlin started a month ago to replace Cathy (as if that's possible) and is still in training but doing very well. She brings almost 4 years experience at Sedgwick County. Welcome both these young ladies to our team! ... See moreSee less

 

Comment on Facebook

WELCOME. Two more nuts added to the Bowl of Nutty Dispatchers!!

I see Cathy she’s still catching up on her sleep 😴

Great additions to the team!

Welcome

It’s like I was never there! 😖

+ View previous comments

1 week ago

Harvey County

Think you missed your shot to get the flu vaccine this year? Nope. It's a great time for it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says flu activity typically peaks between December and February.

The CDC recommends yearly flu vaccinations for anyone 6 months old and older. Our Harvey County Health Department can help with that. Give them a ring at 316-283-1637 and they'll be glad to help you set up an appointment.
... See moreSee less

Think you missed your shot to get the flu vaccine this year? Nope. Its a great time for it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says flu activity typically peaks between December and February.

The CDC recommends yearly flu vaccinations for anyone 6 months old and older. Our Harvey County Health Department can help with that. Give them a ring at 316-283-1637 and theyll be glad to help you set up an appointment.

Comment on Facebook

Is it even the correct strain this year?

Umm I see a big problem with this picture..

1 week ago

Harvey County Parks

Critter of the week!
Tufted Titmouse
Scientific name: Baeolophus bicolor
Genus: Baeolophus
Family: Paridae
Length: 5.5 – 6.3 in. (14 – 16 cm)
Weight: 0.6 – 0.9 oz. (18 – 26 g)
Wingspan: 7.9 – 10.2 in. (20 – 26 cm)

The Tufted titmouse is a small North American songbird that is common is the eastern United States. This species is typically found in areas with dense canopy and many tree species. They are a very vocal bird that sings a clear “peter- peter,” during spring and summer. Individuals forage acrobatically flitting between branches. Most Tufted titmice live their entire lives within a few miles of their birthplace. According to Cherokee legend, this bird is known as a messenger. Also, a group of titmice is called a banditry or a dissimulation of titmice.
The Tufted Titmouse is a stocky little bird that is sparrow-sized or smaller, and is larger than a chickadee. This bird is about six inches long, and has a gray tuft on its head that can be raised or lowered. This bird has a large black eye and a black forehead. The bill is black and stout. The face is a pale grey with a white eye ring. This species has gray upperparts with peach coloring on its sides just below the wings. The underparts of the bird are white. The legs and feet of the Tufted titmouse are gray.
The Tufted Titmouse is a resident species, and does not migrate. The species lives and breeds from eastern Nebraska south to the Gulf coast of Texas and across the eastern states from Florida north to southern Maine. The Tufted titmouse range also extends to the extreme southern parts of Ontario and Quebec. You can find this species in swampy or moist woodlands and urban environments. These birds only live in areas where rainfall is greater than 24 inches per year, and are more likely to be found where rainfall exceeds 32 inches per year. They are present in most eastern woodland areas below 2,000 feet elevation. They can be found in backyards, parks, orchards, and like to visit bird feeders.
The Tufted titmouse is an acrobatic forager. They are a bit slower and more methodical than the chickadee. This bird can be seen flocking with chickadees, kinglets, nuthatches, and woodpeckers. These birds can benefit from the chickadees habit of calling out when a good food source is found. Also, these small birds can notify each other of a threat more easily while in a flock. The flight of the Tufted titmouse tends to be level and fluttery. Titmice like to scout out a food source from the cover of trees before retrieving the food and retreating back to their hiding spot. The song of this species is usually described as a whistled “peter-peter-peter,” but can vary in about 20 different ways. The average lifespan of a Tufted titmouse in the wild is 2 years. However, individuals have been documented that lived over 10 years.
The Tufted titmouse eats many insects including: caterpillars, beetles, wasps, ants, stink bugs, snails, and spiders. They also eat nuts, berries, and seeds. Experiments have shown that they prefer to take the largest seeds they can find while foraging. When they find something like a sunflower seed, they will hold it with their feet and hammer it open with their beak. In the fall and winter, they will store extra shelled seeds in bark crevices. These birds forage acrobatically sometimes hanging upside-down or sideways to investigate branches, cones and other materials. At times, they go all the way to the ground to hop around and look for fallen seeds and insects.
This species usually builds their nests in a hole in a tree or in a nesting box. They are not able to excavate their own area, and rely on natural cavities or ones that have already been hollowed out by other species (Pileated woodpecker, Northern flicker, other woodpecker species). This bird may also choose to build a nest in a fence post or a pipe. Moss, grasses and other materials are used in construction of the nest. Softer materials are used for the lining of the nest (fur, wool, hair, cotton). The nest is complete in 6-11 days. The female titmouse will lay between 3 and 9 eggs. The average clutch size is between 5 and 7. The eggs are white/cream in color and have chestnut red, brown or purple spots. The eggs are about 0.7 inches long and 0.6 inches wide. These eggs take 12-14 days to hatch. Chicks emerge from their shells almost entirely naked except for a few down feathers on their head and back. Their eyes are closed when they first hatch. These nestlings will remain in their nests for about 15 days. Unlike many birds, the young will usually stay with their parents during the winter, and even after they are one year of age. Sometimes these young birds will aid their parents in the raising of their siblings in the next brood.
The Tufted titmouse is a regular visitor at backyard bird feeders, especially in the winter. They love sunflower seeds and will also eat peanuts, suet, and other items. Since they rely on already formed cavities, placing a nesting box in your yard is a good way to attract a breeding pair to your area.

Sources
Sibley, D.A. (2014). The Sibley guide to birds, second edition. Alfred A. Knopt, New York, USA.

Donne, P. (2006). Pete Dunne’s essential field guide companion. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, New York, USA.

Partners in flight (2017). Avian Conservation Assessment Database. 2017.
... See moreSee less

Critter of the week!
Tufted Titmouse 
Scientific name: Baeolophus bicolor
Genus: Baeolophus
Family: Paridae
Length: 5.5 – 6.3 in. (14 – 16 cm)
Weight: 0.6 – 0.9 oz. (18 – 26 g) 
Wingspan: 7.9 – 10.2 in. (20 – 26 cm) 

 The Tufted titmouse is a small North American songbird that is common is the eastern United States. This species is typically found in areas with dense canopy and many tree species. They are a very vocal bird that sings a clear “peter- peter,” during spring and summer. Individuals forage acrobatically flitting between branches. Most Tufted titmice live their entire lives within a few miles of their birthplace. According to Cherokee legend, this bird is known as a messenger. Also, a group of titmice is called a banditry or a dissimulation of titmice. 
 The Tufted Titmouse is a stocky little bird that is sparrow-sized or smaller, and is larger than a chickadee. This bird is about six inches long, and has a gray tuft on its head that can be raised or lowered. This bird has a large black eye and a black forehead. The bill is black and stout. The face is a pale grey with a white eye ring.  This species has gray upperparts with peach coloring on its sides just below the wings. The underparts of the bird are white. The legs and feet of the Tufted titmouse are gray.
The Tufted Titmouse is a resident species, and does not migrate. The species lives and breeds from eastern Nebraska south to the Gulf coast of Texas and across the eastern states from Florida north to southern Maine. The Tufted titmouse range also extends to the extreme southern parts of Ontario and Quebec. You can find this species in swampy or moist woodlands and urban environments. These birds only live in areas where rainfall is greater than 24 inches per year, and are more likely to be found where rainfall exceeds 32 inches per year. They are present in most eastern woodland areas below 2,000 feet elevation. They can be found in backyards, parks, orchards, and like to visit bird feeders. 
 The Tufted titmouse is an acrobatic forager. They are a bit slower and more methodical than the chickadee. This bird can be seen flocking with chickadees, kinglets, nuthatches, and woodpeckers. These birds can benefit from the chickadees habit of calling out when a good food source is found. Also, these small birds can notify each other of a threat more easily while in a flock. The flight of the Tufted titmouse tends to be level and fluttery. Titmice like to scout out a food source from the cover of trees before retrieving the food and retreating back to their hiding spot. The song of this species is usually described as a whistled “peter-peter-peter,” but can vary in about 20 different ways. The average lifespan of a Tufted titmouse in the wild is 2 years. However, individuals have been documented that lived over 10 years. 
 The Tufted titmouse eats many insects including: caterpillars, beetles, wasps, ants, stink bugs, snails, and spiders. They also eat nuts, berries, and seeds. Experiments have shown that they prefer to take the largest seeds they can find while foraging. When they find something like a sunflower seed, they will hold it with their feet and hammer it open with their beak. In the fall and winter, they will store extra shelled seeds in bark crevices. These birds forage acrobatically sometimes hanging upside-down or sideways to investigate branches, cones and other materials. At times, they go all the way to the ground to hop around and look for fallen seeds and insects. 
        This species usually builds their nests in a hole in a tree or in a nesting box. They are not able to excavate their own area, and rely on natural cavities or ones that have already been hollowed out by other species (Pileated woodpecker, Northern flicker, other woodpecker species). This bird may also choose to build a nest in a fence post or a pipe. Moss, grasses and other materials are used in construction of the nest. Softer  materials are used for the lining of the nest (fur, wool, hair, cotton). The nest is complete in 6-11 days. The female titmouse will lay between 3 and 9 eggs. The average clutch size is between 5 and 7. The eggs are white/cream in color and have chestnut red, brown or purple spots. The eggs are about 0.7 inches long and 0.6 inches wide. These eggs take 12-14 days to hatch. Chicks emerge from their shells almost entirely naked except for a few down feathers on their head and back. Their eyes are closed when they first hatch. These nestlings will remain in their nests for about 15 days. Unlike many birds, the young will usually stay with their parents during the winter, and even after they are one year of age. Sometimes these young birds will aid their parents in the raising of their siblings in the next brood. 
 The Tufted titmouse is a regular visitor at backyard bird feeders, especially in the winter. They love sunflower seeds and will also eat peanuts, suet, and other items. Since they rely on already formed cavities, placing a nesting box in your yard is a good way to attract a breeding pair to your area. 

Sources
Sibley, D.A. (2014). The Sibley guide to birds, second edition. Alfred A. Knopt, New York, USA.

Donne, P. (2006). Pete Dunne’s essential field guide companion. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, New York, USA. 

Partners in flight (2017). Avian Conservation Assessment Database. 2017.Image attachmentImage attachment

 

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they have eating my sunflower seeds in Newton 4 years😍

Health Department will open at 10:30AM today, Thursday, December 6. ... See moreSee less

Health Department will open at 10:30AM on Thursday, December 6. ... See moreSee less

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Commission sets county staff holiday schedule for 2019

2018/12/4

The Harvey County Commission has approved 10-1/2 days of public...

Election board completes general election canvass

2018/11/13

Harvey County finished counting votes for the November general election...

Advanced voting for general election begins Oct. 23 in Harvey County

2018/10/22

Advanced voting for the November general election begins Tuesday, Oct...

Tax foreclosure sale scheduled for November

2018/10/12

A tax foreclosure sale will be held for several properties...

Commissioner signs local disaster declaration for flooding

2018/10/9

Harvey County Commission Chair Randy Hague signed a local disaster...

October marks National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

2018/10/3

Americans are spending more time online than ever before. As...

County introduces new resource for meeting documents

2018/09/28

This summer, Harvey County began researching opportunities to find a...

Clerk's Office finalizes primary election results

2018/08/13

The primary election wrapped up in Harvey County on Aug...

Commission presents recommended budget for 2019 fiscal year

2018/07/16

The Harvey County Commission has moved forward with its recommended...

Welcome to Harvey County

Nearly 35,000 residents call Harvey County home. The county landscape pairs picturesque country living with vibrant downtown shopping centers. Harvey County serves the cities of Burrton, Halstead, Hesston, Newton, North Newton, Sedgwick, and Walton, as well as 15 townships.

Harvey County is home to a bustling airport and train service, innovative economic leaders, sprawling parks, and welcoming school districts. Food and entertainment opportunities abound, with even more amenities within a short driving distance to our friendly neighboring counties.

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  • Wheat Field
  • Riverside Park bridge
  • Blue Sky Sculpture 4
  • Sedgwick Cardinals 1
  • King Park